Effects of Nursing Interventions on Intracranial Pressure

Authors: Olson DM, McNett MM, Lewis LS, Riemen KE, Bautista C.

Background Intracranial pressure is a frequent target for goal-directed therapy to prevent secondary brain injury. In critical care settings, nurses deliver many interventions to patients having intracranial pressure monitored, yet few data documenting the immediate effect of these interventions on intracranial pressure are available. Objective To examine the relationship between intracranial pressure and specific nursing interventions observed during routine care. Methods Secondary analysis of prospectively collected observational data. Results During 3118 minutes of observation, 11 specific nursing interventions were observed for 28 nurse-patient dyads from 16 hospitals. Family members talking in the room, administering sedatives, and repositioning the patient were associated with a significantly lower intracranial pressure. However, intracranial pressure was sometimes higher, lower, or unchanged after each intervention observed. Conclusion Response of intracranial pressure to nursing interventions is inconsistent. Most interventions were associated with inconsistent changes in intracranial pressure at 1 or 5 minutes after the intervention.

Intracranial pressure monitoring in severe head injury: compliance with Brain Trauma Foundation guidelines and effect on outcomes: a prospective study

Authors: Talving P, Karamanos E, Teixeira PG, Skiada D, Lam L, Belzberg H, Inaba K, Demetriades D.

Object The Brain Trauma Foundation (BTF) has established guidelines for intracranial pressure (ICP) monitoring in severe traumatic brain injury (TBI). This study assessed compliance with these guidelines and the effect on outcomes. Methods This is a prospective, observational study including patients with severe blunt TBI (Glasgow Coma Scale score ≤ 8, head Abbreviated Injury Scale score ≥ 3) between January 2010 and December 2011. Demographics, clinical characteristics, laboratory profile, head CT scans, injury severity indices, and interventions were collected. The study population was stratified into 2 study groups: ICP monitoring and no ICP monitoring. Primary outcomes included compliance with BTF guidelines, overall in-hospital mortality, and mortality due to brain herniation. Secondary outcomes were ICU and hospital lengths of stay. Multiple regression analyses were deployed to determine the effect of ICP monitoring on outcomes. Results A total of 216 patients met the BTF guideline criteria for ICP monitoring. Compliance with BTF guidelines was 46.8% (101 patients). Patients with subarachnoid hemorrhage and those who underwent craniectomy/craniotomy were significantly more likely to undergo ICP monitoring. Hypotension, coagulopathy, and increasing age were negatively associated with the placement of ICP monitoring devices. The overall in-hospital mortality was significantly higher in patients who did not undergo ICP monitoring (53.9% vs 32.7%, adjusted p = 0.019). Similarly, mortality due to brain herniation was significantly higher for the group not undergoing ICP monitoring (21.7% vs 12.9%, adjusted p = 0.046). The ICU and hospital lengths of stay were significantly longer in patients subjected to ICP monitoring. Conclusions Compliance with BTF ICP monitoring guidelines in our study sample was 46.8%. Patients managed according to the BTF ICP guidelines experienced significantly improved survival.

Imaging signs in idiopathic intracranial hypertension: Are these signs seen in secondary intracranial hypertension too?

Authors: Hingwala DR, Kesavadas C, Thomas B, Kapilamoorthy TR, Sarma PS.

BACKGROUND: The purpose of this study was to evaluate the difference in the occurrence of the various "traditional" imaging signs of intracranial hypertension (IIH) on magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in patients with idiopathic (IIH) and secondary intracranial hypertension.
MATERIALS AND METHODS: In a retrospective analysis, the MRI findings of 21 patients with IIH and 60 patients with secondary intracranial hypertension (41 with tumors; 19 with intracranial venous hypertension) were evaluated for the presence or absence of various "traditional" imaging signs of IIH (perioptic nerve sheath distention, vertical buckling of optic nerve, globe flattening, optic nerve head protrusion and empty sella) using the Fisher's exact test. Odds ratios were also calculated. Statistical Package for the Social Sciences version 17.0 was used for statistical analysis. Subgroup analysis of the IIH versus tumors and IIH versus venous hypertension were performed.
RESULTS: Optic nerve head protrusion and globe flattening were significantly associated with IIH. There was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of rest of the findings. On subgroup analysis, globe flattening and optic nerve head protrusion occurred significantly more often in IIH than in tumors. However, there was no statistically significant difference in the occurrence of any of these findings in patients with IIH and venous hypertension.
CONCLUSIONS: IIH is a diagnosis of exclusion. While secondary causes of raised intracranial pressure (ICP) have obvious clinical findings on MRI, some conditions like cerebral venous thrombosis may have subtle signs and differentiating between primary and secondary causes may be difficult. In the absence of any evident cause of raised ICP, presence of optic nerve head protrusion or globe flattening can suggest the diagnosis of IIH.

Massive cerebral involvement in fat embolism syndrome and intracranial pressure management

Authors: Kellogg RG, Fontes RB, Lopes DK.

Fat embolism syndrome (FES) is a common clinical entity that can occasionally have significant neurological sequelae. The authors report a case of cerebral fat embolism and FES that required surgical management of intracranial pressure (ICP). They also discuss the literature as well as the potential need for neurosurgical management of this disease entity in select patients. A 58-year-old woman presented with a seizure episode and altered mental status after suffering a right femur fracture. Head CT studies demonstrated hypointense areas consistent with fat globules at the gray-white matter junction predominantly in the right hemisphere. This CT finding is unique in the literature, as other reports have not included imaging performed early enough to capture this finding. Brain MR images obtained 3 days later revealed T2-hyperintense areas with restricted diffusion within the same hemisphere, along with midline shift and subfalcine herniation. These findings steered the patient to the operating room for decompressive hemicraniectomy. A review of the literature from 1980 to 2012 disclosed 54 cases in 38 reports concerning cerebral fat embolism and FES. Analysis of all the cases revealed that 98% of the patients presented with mental status changes, whereas only 22% had focal signs and/or seizures. A good outcome was seen in 57.6% of patients with coma and/or abnormal posturing on presentation and in 90.5% of patients presenting with mild mental status changes, focal deficits, or seizure. In the majority of cases ICP was managed conservatively with no surgical intervention. One case featured the use of an ICP monitor, while none featured the use of hemicraniectomy.

Idiopathic intracranial hypertension as an initial presentation of systemic lupus erythematosus

Authors: Maloney K.

A 14-year-old girl with no known illness presented with a several week history of headaches and vomiting. The patient also reported having joint pain and swelling to the wrists and knees. She had no prior history of headaches, use of hormonal contraception or other medications, recent weight changes or family history of autoimmune disease. Blood pressure temperature, height and weight were normal. She was alert, there was alopecia, cervical lympadenopathy, symmetrical synovitis to the wrists, bilateral papilloedema and cranial nerve VI palsy. Laboratory investigations revealed a normochromic normocytic anaemia, leucopenia and lymphopenia. Serum chemistries were normal. CT of the brain was normal. Lumbar puncture revealed an opening pressure of greater than 300 mm H2O; cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) analysis was normal. HIV antibodies were non-reactive. Despite treatment with acetazolamide she developed somnolence. Hence MR venography was performed which showed no evidence of cerebral vein thrombosis. Further investigations revealed a positive direct coombs test, positive antinuclear antibodies (ANA) positive antidouble-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and false positive VDRL. Complement levels were reduced. Anti-Smith, anticardiolipin antibodies and lupus anticoagulant were negative.

Cryptococcus neoformans ex vivo capsule size is associated with intracranial pressure and host immune response in HIV-associated cryptococcal meningitis

Authors: Robertson EJ, Najjuka G, Rolfes MA, Akampurira A, Jain N, Anantharanjit J, von Hohenburg M, Tassieri M, Carlsson A, Meya DB, Harrison TS, Fries B, Boulware DR, Bicanic T.

Background. The Cryptococcus neoformans polysaccharide capsule is a well-characterised virulence factor with immunomodulatory properties. The organism and/or shed capsule is postulated to raise intracranial pressure(ICP) in cryptococcal meningitis(CM) by mechanical obstruction of cerebrospinal fluid(CSF) outflow. Little is known regarding capsule phenotype in human cryptococcosis. We investigated the relationship of ex vivo CSF capsular phenotype with ICP and CSF immune response, as well as in vitro phenotype.Methods. 134 HIV-infected Ugandan adults with CM had serial lumbar punctures with measurement of CSF opening pressures, quantitative cultures, ex vivo capsule size and shedding, viscosity, and CSF cytokines. 108 had complete data. Induced capsular size and shedding were measured in vitro for 48 C. neoformans isolates.Results. Cryptococcal strains producing larger ex vivo capsules in the baseline(pre-treatment) CSF correlated with higher ICP(P=.02), slower rate of fungal clearance(P=.02), and paucity of CSF inflammation, including decreased CSF white blood cell(WBC) count(P<.001), interleukin(IL)-4(P=.02), IL-6(P=.01), IL-7(P=.04), IL-8(P=.03), and interferon-gamma(P=.03). CSF capsule shedding did not correlate with ICP. On multivariable analysis, capsule size remained independently associated with ICP. Ex vivo capsular size and shedding did not correlate with that of the same isolates grown in vitro.Conclusions. Cryptococcal capsule size ex vivo is an important contributor to virulence in human cryptococcal meningitis.

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